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Visit downtown Phoenix in 1933

One thing you can always say about Phoenix is that it constantly changes. If you go away for a few years and come back, there are always new buildings in the place of old...
Occidental between Adams and Monroe on Central Ave.

Visit downtown Phoenix in 1922

Time-travel with us to Phoenix in 1922. The image that we're about to dive into is from the McCulloch Brothers Collection, which ASU just released online recently. It shows the west side of Central...

A look at Sky Harbor’s original terminal (and no, it wasn’t Terminal 1)

When you fly into or out of Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix, you might notice the Terminal numbers are 2, 3 and 4. For many travelers, that raises the question of what happened to...

Explore downtown Phoenix in the 1920s

Let's go history adventuring to an area of downtown Phoenix that should look familiar to you - looking south on Central Avenue from Monroe Street. Of course, this photo came from 1926, so there...
Looking north up Central from Monroe in 1919 towards a city of trees. You're standing in the Heard Building, which is just north of Adams.

A walk under the trees in old-time Phoenix

Let's take a walk back in time to 1915 when Phoenix was a city of trees. It looks strange, doesn't it? Old-timers remember Phoenix before the trees. Fifty years ago this area was just open desert,...
Calvary Church Westown

The surprising history of the big star on Calvary Church’s sign

Drive down I-17 between Thunderbird and Cactus Roads in Phoenix and to the west you will see the Calvary Community Church sign with its big, recognizable star. You probably think nothing of it; after...
Mill Ave, Tempe 1899

What Tempe’s Mill Avenue looked like in 1899

Let's take a walk down Tempe, Arizona's Mill Avenue in 1899. We start from the outskirts of town, at about where University Avenue exists nowadays, and walk north. The two-story building that we see on the right is...
Glendale Avenue and Lincoln Drive

A tale of two roads: Why Glendale Avenue becomes Lincoln Drive

Brad Hall, History Adventuring / Edited for Phoenix.org If you drive around the Valley much, you'll notice the "becomes." For example, in Glendale, Dunlap Avenue becomes Olive Avenue, and at the edge of Tempe and...
Washington Cactus Alley between Central 1st St Lorings Bazar 1880s

The 1887 event that changed Phoenix forever

Brad Hall, History Adventuring / Edited for Phoenix.org Long-time Phoenix residents will agree that the city changes frequently; old buildings are regularly torn down and new buildings spring up. People who grew up here, or even...
The Melrose Curve in the early 1970s. From the Duke University Library Collections.

One tiny mistake that created 7th Avenue’s famous Melrose Curve

As you probably know, Phoenix's major surface streets generally follow a standard north-south, east-west grid layout. The exceptions occur when roads wind through the hills or mountains, and one other spot that doesn't seem to call...

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